Reaching the Unreached

The San people, from our last training, have a particularly unique history: The San people are a tribe of Africans who have lived nomadically within Southern Africa for many decades. With a population of around 2,500 in Zimbabwe, our group is located in the area of Tsholotsho close to the border of Botswana. Originally hunters and gatherers, this community has been faced with varying challenges in maintaining their livelihoods and integrating into the surrounding communities. For most, this training was a time filled with completely new experiences. It was the first time they had left their community; the first time they had traveled on a bus and the first time they had visited the capital city, Harare. They arrived with …

God’s Touch on Kanyaga

Makesure Majenje is quite an amazing man. Leaving behind a worldly past of alcohol, women, illegal gold panning and more – he gave his life to Jesus. It was 1999 when he began the life-changing journey as Jesus took him to Zambia and Malawi for several years, before bringing him home to Zimbabwe in 2005. That was when he became involved with FfF and learned how to farm – God’s way. He began training others, and has since established a training school in his community of Kanyaga. Furthermore, Jesus has used Makesure’s heart and hands reach to out and help many other lives. Most recently he came to Clouds End as part of an eager group of thirty villagers from …

For your Maker is your Husband…Isaiah 54:5

To call this group the Bindura ‘ladies’ is a little unfair, after all, there were two men.  It’s just that the background stories from most of the women are so powerfully lodged in our hearts it’s difficult to stop them from floating to the foreground … Stories of child brides forced into marriages with older men, leading to relationships littered with abuse and neglect of both wife and children.  Although most of these women are ‘married’ –  in reality they are widows of a customary lifestyle.  They do not have live in husbands.  Instead, several of them watch from a distance as their spouses enter a ‘Small House’ each evening … the term given for where Africa’s mistresses are housed …

“I didn’t come all this way to hear the Bible…!”

A weary bunch of travelers disembarked, having trekked halfway across the country from Bulawayo. This group of IWH trainees were from the Ndebele tribe. Their ancestral roots stretch back to a throng of burly Zulus who migrated from South Africa to Zimbabwe in 1838 under King Mzilikazi. Climbing off the bus were non-believers, believers – and a fair number of pew-warming church goers with a load of (spiritual) dirty washing. Perhaps God gave one of His gentle smiles as He watched them. As usual, He had some heart-laundering planned … The following morning after a good night’s sleep, the trainees were ready to begin. Much joyful praise rose up from old and young alike, with devotions opening hearts and setting …